Checking the quality of Dementia Care

Published by on

Quality Dementia Care from Helping Hands

The Helping Hands’ specialist Dementia service is continually developing, with over 50% of our customers over the age of 65 living with a form of the condition. When providing high quality dementia care in the home, Helping Hands ensures comprehensive staff training in order to empower our teams in providing consistent care; from memory loss through to end of life dementia home care.

With many of our customers beginning care with the onset of dementia, and continuing to receive support as their condition advances, continuity and routine are essential in providing a service with a high degree of quality awareness. Abbey-CaseleyAbbey Caseley, Helping Hands Senior Quality Assurance Manager, says; “Quality consistency is particularly important when providing dementia care, as our customers must remain at the centre of their care regardless of how complex or challenging their condition becomes. It is important that we adopt a person-centred, outcome based approach that focuses on what the customer and their family would like to achieve.”

Helping Hands is currently a member of the Dementia Action Alliance, and we have in our full time employment a Dementia UK approved Specialist trainer, who, having completed an intense programme of training through the Association for Dementia Studies at the University of Worcester, is up skilling care and supporting staff in better understanding how best to deliver high quality dementia care in the home. In this way, Helping Hands office staff and Carers enable their customers to preserve decision making and independent living skills, keeping their customer at the centre of their care and doing as much for themselves as possible.

Having provided dementia care for over 25 years, Helping Hands has developed a real understanding of the needs of people affected by the illness, and understand the importance of ensuring staff are confident in managing numerous diagnoses with professional support. Abbey continues;
“When providing care for those living with dementia, it is not only about ensuring all of their personal care needs are met, but also about recognising how we can continue facilitating their hobbies and interests as their condition progresses.

An example is one of our Carers taking their customer to a coffee morning; the quality element not only lies in assisting with washing and dressing in order to look presentable, but also about engaging with their customer and ensuring they gain as much as possible out of socialising with people of the same age with similar interests. By adopting this outcome-based approach we are able to make a positive difference in the lives of many.”

Scroll to top