Who cares for the carers?

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01 November 2012

Who cares for the carers?

Whether it is a mother caring for her baby or an adult caring for an elderly parent, the simple act of care is a wonderful human instinct; it’s strange then that those who care are not more valued by our society.

When you think of the term ‘carer’ or when someone says that they are a ‘carer’ you tend to think of the job that they do or the person they care for; you don’t really think about the individual doing the care – the person behind the job title.

A carer is an individual who is dedicated to looking after others who need a little extra help going about their daily lives. The job attracts people who tend to be unselfish and put others first, who do what they do because they want to make a real difference to people’s lives.

Do you ever wonder about the carer and who cares for them? Who ensures that they are ok, if they are able to cope with their work load or have any questions about the care that they are providing? If a carer is having a bad day, who do they turn to?

Helping Hands directly employs over 1000 carers who work around the England & Wales. Many of these carers are from outside of the UK and find themselves far away from their own homes caring for people in unfamiliar surroundings.

It is understandable then that these carers can become, homesick or downcast at times, especially at this time of year when they may be missing their family and friends. That is why they need a comprehensive support network in place, to help with their day to day duties, but also to ensure that they are coping emotionally. 

To ensure that all our carers receive the support that they require Helping Hands has support teams which cover each area of the country.  This helps both carers and clients as they know that there is someone available in their area who can deal with any issues or problems that may arise.

One of the most positive things we can do for carers is to encourage and support their connections with other like-minded people. This is why many of our regional care managers hold regular coffee mornings around the country for carers to get together and meet one another. These coffee mornings allow them to talk to people who are in the same positions as they are and who understand what it is to be a carer.

We have also developed a Facebook page specifically for our carers, where they can post messages, ask questions, watch new training videos or just catch up with friends they may have made on their induction training, but have subsequently lost contact with. Anyone who is thinking about becoming a carer can also join in and find out more about the job.

Nobody would ever describe caring as an easy job; it can be hard and emotionally tiring.  But when it’s done properly, and a carer is given the correct support from the organisation they work for, there are few jobs more rewarding or more important. 

The work our carers do every day is remarkable – they are often the difference between somebody remaining in their own home or having to go into a residential care home.  Our Carers are incredible and we care about them.

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