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Gender pay update - April 2018

We’re committed to providing equal opportunities across the whole of our team, regardless of age, gender, race or background. As part of this commitment, we’re pleased to present our first gender pay report.

Our gender pay analysis is based on a snapshot of all Helping Hands’ employees who were paid in the payroll period for the 2016-17 tax year, ending on 5th April 2017.

It includes an analysis of bonus payments paid in the same tax year.

Employees at Helping Hands are made up of the following groups and departments:

  • Executive Board of Directors
  • Head office teams and departments
  • Branches, including office-based teams and visiting carers
  • Live-in carers
  • Field-based operational teams

We place special importance on career development at Helping Hands, and there are many examples of people who have progressed their career with us – some who joined us as a carer and are now in a managerial or office-based role.


Pay quartiles

This table outlines the gender distribution at Helping Hands Home Care, across four equally sized quartiles.

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 All employees
Male 11.1% 9.9% 8.2% 9.3% 9.6%
Female 88.9% 90.1% 91.8% 90.7% 90.4%

Gender pay gap

We are very pleased to report that there is a negative gender pay gap at Helping Hands, which means that the average women’s gross hourly earnings are slightly higher than those for men.

This is not to be taken as a concern for male employees. In fact, this gap is because of our predominantly female workforce.

Pay gap

Median (midpoint) Mean (average)
5.9% higher for female colleagues 2.1% higher for female colleagues

For all departments across the business, we do not differentiate on pay rates between male and female, and this is reflected at all levels of the organisation. In fact, the directors on our Executive Board is split 50/50 male/female.


Bonus gap

We pay relatively few bonuses, with most of those that are paid going to operational managers, which are linked to quality, compliance and financial performance.

Some employees at head office are paid commission payments that are linked to performance measured against set targets.

The difference between bonuses for our male and female employees, covering bonuses and commissions, are outlined below:

Percentage of colleagues receiving a bonus

Male Female
 1.1% 2.9%

Bonus gap

Median (midpoint) Mean (average)
 -100.0%  53.4%

These figures are heavily distorted by the proportion of male to female colleagues working at Helping Hands.

During the 2016/17 financial year, bonuses were paid to five out of 440 male colleagues, compared with 132 out of 4,535 female colleagues. Out of these five male colleagues, one was a Board member, which explains why the mean, or average bonus payment, was 100% higher for male colleagues than female.

However, when considering the median, which is the midpoint of all bonus payments, our female colleagues were awarded over 50% higher bonuses than male colleagues.

I confirm that this data has been calculated according to the requirements of The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

Andrew Wood, Finance Director
April 2018


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